Copyright Rosyth & District  Musical  Society circa 2012

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Me and My Girl 2011

Reviewed by: John Urquhart on Tuesday 22 March 2011
Venue: Carnegie Hall, Dunfermline
Type of Production: Musical
Producer/Director: Douglas Watt
Musical Director: Mary Gilfillan
Choreographer: Yvonne Musgrave



Show Report



Me and My Girl is one of these shows that you just can’t go wrong with and it was good to see the audience enjoying themselves so much. It’s impossible to fault Mark Grieve’s portrayal of Bill Snibson in any way. He is well practised and his delivery was faultless. The character dominates the show and the company were fortunate to have someone of Mark’s calibre. Clare McGarr proved an equally strong Sally. She played the part with great attack and her Once You Lose Your Heart was sung beautifully. Leigh Grieve gave a unique performance as Lady Jacqueline and Andy Duncan in his first principal part gave a wonderfully over the top portrayal of Gerald, which the audience loved. Paul Ellard created good comedy as Parchester, particularly in the energetic Family Solicitor. Irene Cook was suitably imposing as the Duchess. James Parvin developed the character of Sir John most effectively as the show progressed. The chorus worked well and the small number of men coped, with just a little augmenting on occasion. Choreography was imaginative and the dancers performed well. The set from Border Studio looked good and worked well, keeping the action flowing. A great night!



Carousel 2012

Reviewed by: John Urquhart on Thursday 29 March 2012
Venue: Carnegie Hall, Dunfermline
Type of Production: Musical
Producer/Director: Douglas Watt
Musical Director: Mary Gilfillan
Choreographer: Yvonne Musgrave



Show Report

Anticipation built up from the very first note of the overture that we were going to see a very traditional production, albeit with some nice touches. MD Mary Gilfillan always gets such a wonderful sound from her orchestras and it was certainly appreciated for this show. The production was visually very attractive with good dancing and strong choreography. Musically, the chorus gave strong support throughout.
Mark Grieve used his considerable experience to give a well rounded portrayal of Billy – totally believable throughout. He handled the potentially difficult soliloquy very effectively. Andy Duncan gave a different but effective take on the role of Enoch. Ryan Cotter gave a sterling performance as Jigger. Clare McGarr looked good and sang beautifully as Julie while Paula Zak gave a naïve and very likeable edge to the part of Carrie. Lorraine Dobbie was ideal as Nettie with Patricia Watt giving an excellent character portrayal of Mrs Mullins. I particularly enjoyed Donna Ewing’s interpretation of Louise. I found her characterisation to be so believable and really engaging.
High point for me was Julie and the chorus singing ‘What’s the use of Wond’ring’. I also particularly enjoyed the imaginative ballet number set on the beach, which was well thought-out and beautifully performed.

 

 

Oliver 2013

 

Reviewed by: John Urquhart on Thursday 29 March 2013
Venue: Carnegie Hall, Dunfermline
Type of Production: Musical
Producer/Director: Yvonne Musgrave
Musical Director: Mary Gilfillan
Choreographer: Yvonne Musgrave

 

Show Report

 

Congratulations to Yvonne Musgrave in her first year as Director. This was a busy production with chorus fully utilised throughout. The children worked hard and were clearly well rehearsed, never putting a foot wrong. Andrew Morris and Luise Mutch both proved delightful Olivers and won over the audience. lewis Aitken and Liam Izatt similary excelled as the Artful Dodger, performing their parts with such enthusiasum. Mark Grieve used his considerable experience to good effect in creating a thoughly convincing Fagin, likeable but with just the right amount of menace. Andy Duncan on the other hand gave a really sinister portrayal  of Bill Sykes - i loved it!  Clare McGarr gave a nicely balanced portrayal of Nacy - plenty of spirit with a good balance of Pathos. "As long as he needs me"did not disapoint. Bill Blenman gave a really strong performance as Mr Bumble - Great accent and believable character and excellent comedy with Leigh Grieve ably partnered him as Widow Corney. The General Company provided great support throughout as did the orchestra. A well thought out production carefully rehearsed making for a good show and a very happy company.

 

 

 

The Producers 2014

 

Reviewed by:Mike Pendlowski on Thursday 27 March 2014
Venue: Carnegie Hall, Dunfermline
Type of Production: Musical
Producer/Director: Yvonne Musgrave
Musical Director: Mary Gilfillan
Choreographer: Yvonne Musgrave

 

Show Report

 

This show with book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan romps along with excellent pace, while still bringing to the fore the outrageous nature of the piece which is anything but P.C.! The two male co-leads are without doubt the pillars around which Director, Yvonne Musgrave builds this excellent production. Mark Grieve as theatre producer, Max Bialystock, gives a faultless performance with pace and excellent comedic timing. His co-lead Leo Bloom (Andy Duncan) also performs well, giving a contrasting character to Bialystock’s manic business style. The pair formulate a scheme to make money by staging a major flop – “Springtime for Hitler” written by neo-Nazi pigeon fancier Franz Liebkind performed with first class comedy timing by James Parvin. Liebkind cast in the role of Hitler, is, however, unable to appear and the day is saved by camp theatre director Roger De Bris (Craig Smith) and wonderfully aided and abetted by assistant director, the ultra-camp Carmen Ghia (Terry Connelly) – both of whom make the most of their character parts.Love interest in the show comes in the shapely form of Ulla Tallen-Hallen (Sarah Moor) a blonde, Swedish bombshell, who runs away to Brazil with Bloom. Sadly for Bialystock and Bloom, far from being a flop, “Springtime for Hitler” is an outstanding success and, consequently, a major financial loss for the pair.A host of minor principal parts were ably presented, notably Bryan, the Set Designer (Martin Glover), Kevin, the Costume Designer (Liam A. Black) and Scott, the Choreographer (David Tillier) all of whom took on the campness of their Director and Assistant. Lorraine Dobie as Hold Me-Touch Me provided more amusement in what was a first class, hilarious production.Choreography by Yvonne Musgrave was energetic and complemented the rest of the show. Sets were well designed and the multiple scene changes worked well under the watchful eye of Stage Manager, Sheona Goodall.Well done R.D.M.S.!

 

 

 

The Wizard of Oz 2015

 

 

Producer / Director

Claire Bloomfield

 

Musical Director

Mary Gilfillan

 

Choreographer

Claire Robertson

 

Review

Author: Mike Pendlowski

 

Rosyth & District Musical Society presented us with one of the classical stage and film musicals of all time. Unfortunately, I cannot quote which version of the musical was used since no reference was made to this in the programme.

 

Principals all worked well to help to structure an entertaining production.  Lucy Duffy as Dorothy gave a confident portrayal in this central role, while Aunt Em (Lorraine Dobie) was kind and sympathetic throughout – just as expected of this character.  The baton-twirling Good Witch played here by Karen Stewart was always ready to be a motherly confidant to Dorothy on her travels.  As the Wicked Witch of the West, Jacqueline Hannan gave a lively, cackling performance.  All the above were suitably aided and abetted by Andy Duncan (Zeke / Cowardly Lion), Sean Mitchell (Hickory / Tin Man) and Keith Abbot (Hunk / Scarecrow). These characters, probably, for the children in the audience at least, are the three that are most identified with this show – and they didn’t disappoint. Each maintained his characterisation throughout, and, I am sure, endeared himself to the younger audience members.  Chorus and dancers all worked hard. Chorus diction, sadly, was generally indistinct and often lost underneath principal voices. Sound for principals, nevertheless, was good, and usually crept over that of the orchestra.

 

Sets for a show like Wizard of Oz were, possibly, a little disappointing.  Pastel coloured sets can be acceptable for the early scenes but, when we get to the Emerald City we should notice a major change in the style and colour of the setting. Also, having characters in black costumes against a black/dark grey backcloth makes for great difficulty in viewing the scene.

That said, having spoken with some members of the audience after the performance, they enjoyed the show – and, after all, that is why companies like RDMS still continue to perform after more than 60 years!

 

 

The Wedding Singer 2018

Date                    28th March 2018

Society                Rosyth & District Musical Society

Venue                  Carnegie Hall, Dunfermline

Director               Yvonne Musgrave

Musical Director Mary Gilfillan

Choreographer    Yvonne Musgrave

Report

Author: Mike Pendlowski

The Wedding Singer, a less frequently performed musical, premiered in 2006, revolves around Robbie – the wedding singer of the title – his failed relationship with his fiancée Linda and his romance with new love, Julia.

This show requires, and was indeed supplied with, a strong cast - all of whom performed both vocally and physically with energy and reassurance.   Robbie (Steven Smyth), Sammy (Connor Mitchell), Glen (Scott Hunter), Julia (Sarah Moor), Holly (Lizzie O’Hare) and Linda (Blythe Johnston) all exuded confidence and were ideally cast in their particular roles. The part of Robbie’s Grandma, Rosie, lends itself to a characterful actress, and tonight this was certainly the case, being in the capable, experienced hands of Irene Cook! A number of minor principals all played their parts extremely well and, like the principals, excelled in portraying believable characterisations throughout. The chorus both male and female, were equally strong and supportive in singing and character, while the dancers’ energy was definitely the icing on the (wedding!) cake.

Sound may have sounded, to some, on the loud side, however I felt it was quite in keeping with the 80’s rock-style score, and certainly a good  balance between cast and band was never in doubt.

Settings were minimalistic, in fact, largely furniture props and a number of trucks. However, even with this relatively small number of items to change, the scene changes (and there were many!) did tend to drag a little.  Hopefully, as the week progressed these changes would become slicker.

The ten piece band, under the baton of Mary Gilfillan, were certainly one of the high points of the show – the musicians obviously being very happy playing this genre of music.

Finally, congratulations to director, Yvonne Musgrave, for guiding the cast through an intensive rehearsal process and ending up with a most enjoyable evening of musical entertainment!

 

 

 

 

 

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